Stage

In 1998, I had the pleasure to see one of American theater’s great dramas, Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh, staged at one of the grand old theater houses of London’s West End, the Old Vic, where Kevin Spacey was then headlining in the role of doomed interventioner (and erstwhile salesman) Theodore “Hickey” Hickman. I’ve reread the play a couple times over the years, including this past week. This most recent reading uncovered some of the plays more deeply held pleasures—well, deeply held from me, that is—and I’d like to talk about ‘em. Maybe during this discussion, I’ll discover why I keep returning to O’Neill’s depressing world of drunks, addicts, layabouts, and ne’er-do-wells.

Sunday, 10 November 2013 00:00

David Downs: Staying in Character

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David Downs is a professor-emeritus of acting at Northwestern University, where he's taught for more than 30 years. Over the course of his distinguished career, he's instructed some of Hollywood's biggest stars. He currently writes about the theater at his blog, David Going On, and we're proud to feature his content here at CC2K.

In this entry, originally published in June 2010, Downs fields a simple question about acting -- and offers an epic response.

David Downs is a professor-emeritus of acting at Northwestern University, where he's taught for more than 30 years. Over the course of his distinguished career, he's instructed some of Hollywood's biggest stars. He currently writes about the theater at his blog, David Going On, and we're proud to feature his content here at CC2K. Today, Downs answers a letter from a recent theater grad.

pulpshakespeareRunning in Los Angeles, Pulp Shakespeare is an entertaining thought experiment that re-imagines Quentin Tarantino’s instant classic as an Elizabethan play.

Before I go on, please be aware that I’ll be dealing in spoilers. Yes, yes, yes — it might sound silly to warn for spoilers in Pulp Fiction, a story that’s almost 20 years old, but one of the pleasures of this production, by a group called Her Majesty’s Secret Players, is how the play’s five adapters translate the movie’s memorable wordplay and gags into Elizabethan terms.

YA author and voice-over talent Meredith Zeitlin reviews this immersive new production.

Reviewing Sleep No More, British theater company Punchdrunk’s debut NYC offering, is difficult - and maybe even pointless. The fact is, no matter what you read about the production, you won’t actually end up seeing the same show the reviewer did. You might even have an experience that is one hundred percent different. So isn’t reading a review of something you can’t actually buy a ticket to kind of… silly? Maybe.

YA author and voice-over talent Meredith Zeitlin offers her thoughts on this off-Broadway production.

Here’s the thing about Sharr White’s new play The Other Place, sparely directed by Joe Mantello at the Lucille Lortel Theatre: it’s quite good. But it doesn’t actually matter. You buy a ticket to see Laurie Metcalf.

Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon interviews the man behind the guerilla-theater response to Julie Taymor's Broadway behemoth.

It’s no secret that the Broadway show Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark has been plagued by numerous cast injuries, poor writing, and bad press.  Given the $65 million price that went towards production of the show, many are left wondering why so much money was spent in the first place.  In the wake of this catastrophic disaster emerged a show that many hope will turn theater on its head.  Created by writer Justin Moran (POPE! The Musical), The Spidey Project: With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility is a guerilla-style theater production that aims to write, rehearse, and perform a Spider-Man-inspired musical within 30 days on a $0 budget.  The show is scheduled for two performances on March 14th at the Peoples Improv Theatre in NYC.

Thursday, 10 February 2011 00:00

Spider-Man: Turn Off The Dark

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Through a series of rewrites, months of previews (and still going), broken bones, and lawsuits what kind of web has Spidey spun? CC2K traveled to NYC's Foxwoods Theatre for a "preview" of Spider-man: Turn Off The Dark. We have to state that the show is still in "previews" (since November 28, 2010 which is more then 70 previews) with an opening date scheduled for March 15, 2011 (its fifth new opening date). Please note that this critique is not about the final version of the show. However, CC2K is assuming based on insider information that (though there might be small tweaks) we have witnessed the final version of SM: TOTD. *WARNING SPOILERS*


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Rachael Lawrence, Molly McCook and Chris Voltaire.
In this interview, The musical director for Octomom the Musical talks about how the production evolved from a simple idea to a full show packed with 14 new songs.


ImageIn continuing with my “Documentaries You Must Watch” series, I’d planned to review/tout the Maysles’ Brothers 1975 documentary Grey Gardens, the unforgettable story of Little Edie Beale and her mother, Big Edie, aunt and cousin of the world-famous Jackie O., and their lives together in a deteriorating East Hampton mansion. 

Then, coincidentally, I heard of a play After the Garden, based on a performance Little Edie (now dead) gave in NYC in 1978, a cabaret bit, a little song, a little dance, a lot of Edie. This play was written by Gerald Duval, a guy who actually knew Edie back then, and who was intimately involved in this short-lived nightclub engagement. I had to see it, to compare it to the film, to get another side of the subject matter. So see it I did.

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