Stage Essays Etc

Stage Essays Etc (5)

In 1998, I had the pleasure to see one of American theater’s great dramas, Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh, staged at one of the grand old theater houses of London’s West End, the Old Vic, where Kevin Spacey was then headlining in the role of doomed interventioner (and erstwhile salesman) Theodore “Hickey” Hickman. I’ve reread the play a couple times over the years, including this past week. This most recent reading uncovered some of the plays more deeply held pleasures—well, deeply held from me, that is—and I’d like to talk about ‘em. Maybe during this discussion, I’ll discover why I keep returning to O’Neill’s depressing world of drunks, addicts, layabouts, and ne’er-do-wells.

Sunday, 10 November 2013 00:00

David Downs: Staying in Character

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David Downs is a professor-emeritus of acting at Northwestern University, where he's taught for more than 30 years. Over the course of his distinguished career, he's instructed some of Hollywood's biggest stars. He currently writes about the theater at his blog, David Going On, and we're proud to feature his content here at CC2K.

In this entry, originally published in June 2010, Downs fields a simple question about acting -- and offers an epic response.

David Downs is a professor-emeritus of acting at Northwestern University, where he's taught for more than 30 years. Over the course of his distinguished career, he's instructed some of Hollywood's biggest stars. He currently writes about the theater at his blog, David Going On, and we're proud to feature his content here at CC2K. Today, Downs answers a letter from a recent theater grad.

Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon interviews the man behind the guerilla-theater response to Julie Taymor's Broadway behemoth.

It’s no secret that the Broadway show Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark has been plagued by numerous cast injuries, poor writing, and bad press.  Given the $65 million price that went towards production of the show, many are left wondering why so much money was spent in the first place.  In the wake of this catastrophic disaster emerged a show that many hope will turn theater on its head.  Created by writer Justin Moran (POPE! The Musical), The Spidey Project: With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility is a guerilla-style theater production that aims to write, rehearse, and perform a Spider-Man-inspired musical within 30 days on a $0 budget.  The show is scheduled for two performances on March 14th at the Peoples Improv Theatre in NYC.


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Rachael Lawrence, Molly McCook and Chris Voltaire.
In this interview, The musical director for Octomom the Musical talks about how the production evolved from a simple idea to a full show packed with 14 new songs.